Aircraft Doors, Overhead Bins, and Beverage Carts Keep Flight Attendants from Flying after Injury

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Opening and closing an aircraft door requires the strength to lift 80 pounds. An injured flight attendant may not be able to return to full duty work following a workplace injury.
Opening and closing an aircraft door requires the strength to lift 80 pounds. An injured flight attendant may not be able to return to full duty work following a workplace injury.

Many aircraft passengers are under the mistaken belief that flight attendants do not have significant physical duties in their jobs.They could not be more mistaken.

Flight attendants are responsible for the critically important task of opening and shutting the aircraft door, which requires the strength to lift 80 pounds.  Flight attendants also assist passengers putting luggage in the overhead bins in order to keep the aisles clear and safe.

Although many people think flight attendants are merely glorified cocktail waitresses, pushing and pulling beverage cart and food service items require significant strength.

In several cases won by the Abrams Landau law firm, flight attendants have sustained the following types of injuries in the line of duty:

  • Torn rotator cuff
  • Cervical spine injury
  • Pulled muscles
  • Neck injury

If these airline employees are not able to return to work and perform all of their physical duties, and they are not allowed back on the flight crew, they may be assigned to ticketing or another desk-type job. This in turn may lead to additional partial wage loss for which benefits may be sought pursuant to the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Act.

Reagan National and Dulles International Airport injury lawyer Doug Landau notes that the return to duty issue is often complicated in lengthy work disability cases. The treating doctors may write that the injured employee can return to work, but the Airline and FAA regulations may not permit return to the air or the AOA (“Air Operations Area”).

If you or someone you know is a flight attendant who has been injured during the course and scope of your job and there are questions as to what laws apply, email or call Abrams Landau, Ltd. at once (703-796-9555).