Snowsport Helmets not just for dorks; hot helmets becoming the norm

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WInter sports injury lawyer Doug Landau notes increasing use of helmets by skiers, snowboarders and other winter sports enthusiasts
Winter sports and traumatic brain injury lawyer Doug Landau notes increasing use of helmets by skiers, snowboarders and other cold weather sports enthusiasts

It used to be rare to see helmets on the slopes; snowboarders, skiers thought they were “uncool, dorky,” and for wimps. But serious injury and stylish helmet design have caused those wearing head protection to be in the majority. Winter sports injury lawyer Doug Landau noticed all colors of helmets during recent trips to New England ski, snowboard and tubing hills. Commending the increase in winter sports head protection, Landau hopes that the increasing use of helmets will lead to a concomitant decrease in traumatic brain injury and head trauma in injured winter athletes.

According to NBC Sports, Helmets, one of the fastest growth areas in the snowsports industry, have moved over the hump and are no longer considered too niche or dorky for the masses. Safety is the driving reason to wear them, of course, but improved styling and comfort may be what make them a no-brainer. “In the last couple of years, you see a big movement toward helmets — it just makes sense,” says Ted Ligety, the U.S. Olympic skier who has been sporting a bright orange helmet in Vancouver. “I started wearing a helmet when I was 4 years old. I feel super naked if I’m not wearing a helmet. My parents did a good job engraining it in my head.” Wearing helmets for recreational skiing and snowboarding often starts with the kids, and then parents.
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