Posted by:
Because a cyclist's cuts and scars can heal and footprints disapear, TAKE PICTURES !
Because a cyclist's cuts and scars can heal and footprints disapear, TAKE PICTURES !

In addition to audio evidence, collecting physical evidence can also support a case of violent dog attack against a biker, runner, postman or walker. Doug Landau and investigators for ABRAMS LANDAU seek and collect hair, skin or fur from the attacking animal. These tissue samples can be matched just like DNA evidence in a rape or assault case involving humans and introduced in Court.Another piece of evidence that can help an injured biker’s case is a report from an “expert witness.” A bike mechanic’s report that the damage to the bent bike frame is consistent with a dog attack from the side as opposed to a fall or bicycle crash can help prove an animal attack case where the only witness is the cyclist herself. Doug Landau has introduced physical evidence in bicycle accident cases in Leesburg, Fairfax, Loudoun and Washington, D.C. In one case, pictures of the bike tires’ grooves in the soft shoulder of the road helped prove the cyclists’ direction of travel and position right before the injury producing “point of impact.”At ABRAMS LANDAU, we have cases where clients have also downloaded information from their Garmin GPS units, Polar Electro monitors and other data collection and electronic exercise equipment to show their bike speed was not unsafe or excessive; that they were not at an “excited” heart rate until the very moment of the attack or impact; or the location of the point where the dogs or other animals started their “chase” before pouncing on the cyclist.There are other methods of proving these violent cases, including measuring skid marks and yaw marks; mapping debris fields; locating blood stain and spilled liquids; and, marking foot and paw prints in appropriate cases. Photographs with digital cameras, cell phones and PDAs can be very helpful, before wet paw prints or sweaty foot prints (like those in the photo) evaporate, are covered or the accident scene is compromised. If you, or someone you know, has ben injured by a dog or animal attack, please e-mail or call us at once at (703)-796-9555.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.