Tag Archives: virginia workers compensation

Residential buildings with workers' scaffolding around it. If employees do not wear the mandated fall protection harnesses, belts, or other safety equipment, and are injured as a result, then their workers' comp benefits may be denied.

Violation of Safety Rule may not bar Workers’ Comp

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Willful Violation of a known and enforced safety rule: Bad news for the injured worker The violation of a known and enforced safety rule by an employee often serves to cause an otherwise valid workplace injury claim to be denied by the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission. It does not matter how serious the injuries are;

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Attorney Doug Landau poses in front of a medical tent at the Marine Corps Marathon

Nurse Case Managers: Wolves in Sheeps’ Clothing?!!?

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Whose side are they on, anyway? After a workplace accident, an injured worker has enough to worry about, like paying for food, rent, utilities, gas, etc., without having to worry about whether nurse case managers, the insurance company, or employer assigned to his case are interfering, or worse, setting him up for denial or termination

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“Permanent Total Disability” in Workers Compensation Does NOT Require the Loss of Both Legs, But the “Inability to Use Both Legs for Work”

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Generally, in order to get wage loss benefits BEYOND the 500 week limit, a worker injured in the Commonwealth has to have lost 2 arms, 2 legs, 2 hands, 2 eyes, 2 feet, etc., in the same workplace accident. In a recent appeal to the Virginia Court of Appeals, an employer’s argument that the Virginia

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Increased Spending on Workers’ Comp Due to Increased Employment, Not Higher Benefits for Injured Workers

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The National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI), which studies workers’ compensation and other benefits systems, last August reported that in 2012: workers’ compensation benefits rose by 1.3 percent to $61.9 billion employer costs rose by 6.9 percent to $83.2 billion. The uptick, NASI said, was due to increased employment. “This growth in workers’ compensation spending

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